Thursday, September 4, 2014

View on Volunteers

Director’s Cuts

John Edmonds has been the Director of “A Spirit Walk” for 12 years. When he sends communications to our cast and crew of over 70 people, he includes Did You Know snippets in each email. These Director’s Cuts are John’s snippets that may captivate your curiosity about the world and the events portrayed in the Pickering Museum Village Production “A Spirit Walk: Call to Rebellion!”.

Did you know…
On Monday December 4, 1837 Samuel Lount led about 80-100 men down Yonge St. through Richmond Hill to meet rebels at Montgomery’s Tavern.

They passed Lot 49 East owned by retired Lt. Col. Robert Moodie. They captured Tory David Blatchford who ordered them to stop. Being a friend of Lount, Blatchford was let go if he went straight home. Blatchford went to Moodie’s home and along with William Crew and Hugh Stewart the four men headed to Toronto to warn Bond Head. Aaron Munshaw at Lot 51 West, a rebel, noticed the four and he raced to Montgomery’s Tavern to warn Mackenzie.

At the rebel road block at Montgomery’s Tavern Moodie was shot, after he fired first, and was the first casualty of the Rebellion. Blatchford, who Lount let go, got around the skirmish and warned Bond Head and later was one of the Loyalists who burned Montgomery’s Tavern on December 7.

Not sure why all this mattered? Join us this September and take a walk back into Pickering’s past with Hannah Matthews as your guide. Meet the residents of Pickering and hear their side of the story about the events that led to Rebellion. For more information about “A Spirit Walk: Call to Rebellion!” go to pickering.ca/museum.

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Curiosity Corner

In December 2013, ten students from Trinity College School joined us at the museum for Week Without Walls.  The students researched, photographed and wrote a brief blog about each of the museum’s buildings. 

Oddfellows’ Hall

By: Graeme Watt

Trinity College School

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Oddfellows’ Hall, Brougham Museum Site

Oddfellows’ Hall was built as a Christian church in Whitevale in 1869. Even though it was built as a church, it was only used for prayer for around ten years. In the early 1890’s it was bought by the International Order of Oddfellows’ Lodge for $200. After it was bought, they remodelled most of the building, including removing the steeple and adding a fake ceiling. The Oddfellows Lodge held meetings until 1966. When the Lodge moved to Brougham, they held their meetings in the Town Hall.

            When the Lodge moved, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Cooper purchased the Oddfellows’ Hall and donated it to the Pickering Township Museum. Even though the outside of the building remained in good condition during the trip to the museum, the interior suffered severe damage. The majority of the windows and the plaster had to be replaced. During the restoration, the false ceiling was also removed. Even though there were restorations, many things such as the window frames, inside doors, balcony and all of the woodwork are all still original.

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            The Hall was moved to the original museum site by Russell Harrison. He was able to add rollers to the bottom of the church and he towed it away. The route that Harrison took was along the road to Fred Palk’s field. The building arrived to the field with much difficulty, where it was left for a drier day to move the rest of the way.

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Work Cited:

McKay, William A. The Pickering Story. Pickering: The Township of Pickering Historical Society, 2004. Print.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Curiosity Corner

In December 2013, ten students from Trinity College School joined us at the museum for Week Without Walls.  The students researched, photographed and wrote brief blogs about each of the museum’s buildings.

Miller Cole House

By: Zachary Didone

Trinity College School

The Miller–Cole House is a house made by Luten Miller and was built 1840.  It has a unique design compared to the other buildings in the village. It was originally located at the corner of the 9th Concession and 16th Avenue in Markham. It is certainly one of the most colorful and well designed. I wasn’t too sure about this house, but once I saw the beauty in the architecture I really started to enjoy it and it should be something everyone should see.

 imageMiller Cole House Exterior

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Interior Construction

The wood clapboard outer layer is what covers the house and is very similar to some designs I’ve seen on newer, more modern houses. It looks great on the outside and on the inside but what’s really interesting is that the walls cover up the fascinating interior. The outside and inside are both just as amazing and considering its been there for more than 100 years its just incredible how well it was made and still being able to stand today.

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Miller Cole House Original Location

Even though the Miller-Cole house has changed significantly since it was first made, it is still astonishing as to what kind of wood working used to go on back then. It had its roof raised, and many more tweaks to it’s design, but the biggest one and probably the one that makes it look so good today is that one part of the house was too big. By that I mean there was a part of the house detached in the moving process because it was too big for the truck, and because of that it looks the way it does. When they re-attached it, they put it side ways instead of straight out. If you haven’t guessed which part of the house it is, it’s the kitchen.

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Kitchen Stove

There are many things I love about this house and for what it is and when it was made I really cant find any flaws with the house other than the spiral staircase since it is very steep and thin in parts. All in all I really enjoyed taking pictures of the house and creating this short blog about it. It has really opened my eyes on some of the architecture that was possible back then and showed me there’s magnificence in an old worn down building.

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Stair Case

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Beef Ring Barn

In December 2013, ten students from Trinity College School joined us at the museum for Week Without Walls.  The students researched, photographed and wrote brief blogs about each of the museum’s buildings.

Beef Ring Barn

By Susie Bahen

Trinity College School

The barn was originally located south of the 9th Concession (Lot 12, Concession 8, Pickering Township). H. R. Gray generously donated the building. 

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This is what the Beef Ring Barn looks like in the winter.

It’s a small building, 12 ½ x 16 ½. It is board-and-batten construction. As you can see in the pictures, it has wood panels with pieces of wood running down the sides.

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This is what board and batten looks like.

The roof is covered in wood shingles, with wood pieces running across the bottom. The shingles are made of cedar by the volunteers at the Pickering Museum Village.

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These are the shingles on the roof.  They were made by PMV Volunteers.

The beef ring barn was like a community butcher and no pieces of meat would be wasted.

This particular building was built in 1870 and used until the early fifties, according to Ed Cammack, the last butcher’s brother.

After being fattened up through the summer, the animals would be sent to the barn to be prepared to be preserved. Each animal would have to weigh a certain amount or more. If the animal weighed less, the owner would have to pay a fee for every pound it was under. Each member would get a 20-pound share of a 600-pound cow.  However, by the time it was skinned and the parts that would not have been eaten were removed the weight would be reduced to 400 pounds. Any excess meat went to the animals’ owner and his family.

The Beef Ring Barn would help bring people of the community together; they would help each other stay fed and get protein.

Works Cited:                        

Robert A. Miller’s Book The Ontario Village of       Brougham: Past! Present! Future?. Published 1973

Oral history recorded from Ed Cammack, Fall 2008

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Curiosity Corner

In December 2013, ten students from Trinity College School joined us at the museum for Week Without Walls.  The students researched, photographed and wrote brief blogs about each of the museum’s buildings.

The Bible Christian Chapel

By: Connor Purdy

Trinity College School

The Bible Christian Chapel is an older building, built in 1853. It was originally located in the northeast corner of the intersection of the 24th Line and the 5th Concession of the Pickering Township. The owner of the building was originally a Quaker, who later converted to a Bible Christian, named Nathaniel Hastings. The building was towed from its previous location by a powerful truck, to where it lies now, in the Pickering Museum Village.

The Chapel has had many additions to it including the old reel pump organ. The organ was made by the Estey Organ Co. in 1887.  Fun fact, the organ still works and is played for enjoyment.

The candle fixtures have been re-created and donated by a local blacksmith in 2001. The candle features can be lowered to a point where they can be lit. Even though the lighting has been re-created, there still is no source of heat such as a stove or a fireplace in the Chapel.

The Pickering Museum Village Foundation, with a grant from Benjamin Moore Paint Co., had the inside of the chapel repainted. The benches have been replicated and replaced, but the locations of the original benches are easily identifiable.

As seen in the photographs below, the arcs above the windows and front entrance make it an obvious example of gothic architecture.

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Bible Christian Chapel - Looking North West

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Bible Christian Chapel - Windows

Although the Bible Chapel may not immediately look like one of the most interesting buildings, the rich history and the original features make it a very intriguing structure.

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Through the Keyhole at the Bible Christian Chapel

Work Cited:

McKay, William A. The Pickering Story. Pickering: The Township of Pickering Historical Society, 2004. Print.

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This is a photograph of a famous painter, Tom Thomson, taken in 1895.[1] Thomson is seen with a moustache that has been styled into a Pyramidal Moustache. A Pyramidal Moustache is shorter on the top, and longer on the bottom, slightly resembling a pyramid.[2]

Tom Thomson was born in 1877 in Pickering, on Concession 8 and was the son of John Thomson. As a young man, Thomson became quite a famous painter, eventually joining and becoming one of the famous “Group of Seven.”  After his death in 1917, his paintings have been put on display around the world, in many different exhibitions.[3]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca

 



[1] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive  and Lillian M. Gauslin. From Paths to Planes: A Story of the Claremont Area.

Ontario: Lillian M. Gauslin, 1974, p. 266-267.

[2] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[3] Gauslin, p. 266-267.

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This photograph was taken in the 1900s of Frederick Lachlan Green.[1] In this photo Green is sporting a moustache, which he styled into a Handlebar Moustache. A Handlebar Moustache is a style of moustache that can be worn either long or petite. It is usually a bushier style of moustache, with the ends grown long and curled upwards with the help of wax. [2]

Frederick L. Green is the grandson of the founder of Greenwood, Frederick Green, whom he was named after. In 1894, he married Katherine Stevenson, and he continued to run the Green enterprises in the village of Greenwood. Green, was also both a farmer as well as a miller, and eventually became the President of the Dominion Jersey Breeders Association; raising a large herd of Jersey cattle on the farm he named Unadilla.[3] Green passed away on April 29 1945, and he is buried in the Pickering area.[4]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive. Pickering Public Library & Ajax Public Library. 2003. Web. July-August 2013. <http://www.pada.ca/>  

[2] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013. Web. July-August 2013.

http://www.ftmguide.org/facialhair.html#top

[3] Beatrice McLean and Irven McLean. Greenwood Through the Years. Canada:  The Forum, 1963

[4] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive, and McLean, 1963.

Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This is a photograph of Samuel Green, the son of Frederick Green, the founder of Greenwood.[1] The facial hairstyle displayed in this photo is a partial beard in the style of Mutton Chops. For this style, the sideburns are grown longer as well as wider. Mutton Chops are one of the most common styles of facial hair. Usually the chin is kept clean shaven, although the sideburns can be grown to almost reach the chin line.[2]

Samuel Green was born in 1836, married Catherine Slater and had a family of four children, including Frederick L. Green. Following in his father’s footprints, Green entered the milling business, carrying on his father’s legacy. Beginning in 1877, Green became the deputy reeve of the Pickering Township; this was only a year before his death at the age of 41.[3]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive. & McLean, Greenwood Through the Years.

[2] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013

[3] McLean, Greenwood Through the Years

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This is a photograph of the Green River Shamrocks Football Club, taken in 1909.[1] Three individuals in the back row of this photo display facial hair. From left to right, the first and third men have moustaches in the style of a Chevron, which is worn longer, bushier and covering the upper lip. [2]  The second man has a moustache in the style of a Copstash Standard, which is the length of the upper lip, and is not too bushy.[3] 

Throughout the history of the Pickering Township, football was one of the most popular summer sports played. It was in 1898 that the Green Shamrocks was first established, and quickly became a powerful club.  The football club was eventually added to the Ontario Association, and it won the league championships during the years of 1907, 1909, 1910 in the Pickering Township area. This football club even went so far as to place 2nd out of all Ontario teams, in the years 1907 and 1910, playing in the final games.[4]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive.

[2] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013 & Expanded Facial Hair Types Sheet

[3] Expanded Facial Hair Types Sheet

[4] Wood, William R. Past Years in Pickering. Toronto: William Briggs, 1911, p. 209

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

In this photo taken in 1880, Eli Barclay has a full beard, in the style of a Spade. A Spade beard is a larger and longer style of beard that is joined through the side burns, and does not involve a moustache.[1] 

Eli Barclay was born in 1825, to George Elder Barclay, in the Pickering Township.[2] After his father’s death, he remained on the family farm, becoming quite wealthy during the years of the Crimean War, cultivating his land.[3] Barclay married Mary Ann Harper, and raised a family of eight children.[4] In 1865, Eli Barclay finished the construction of his home, which he entitled “Ever Green Villa”, which cost nearly $800 to build. Eli Barclay passed away in year 1893.[5]            

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[2] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive & Miller, p. 292-296

[3] McKay, p. 198-200

[4] Miller, p. 292-296

[5] McKay, p. 198-200