Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

In this photo taken in 1880, Eli Barclay has a full beard, in the style of a Spade. A Spade beard is a larger and longer style of beard that is joined through the side burns, and does not involve a moustache.[1] 

Eli Barclay was born in 1825, to George Elder Barclay, in the Pickering Township.[2] After his father’s death, he remained on the family farm, becoming quite wealthy during the years of the Crimean War, cultivating his land.[3] Barclay married Mary Ann Harper, and raised a family of eight children.[4] In 1865, Eli Barclay finished the construction of his home, which he entitled “Ever Green Villa”, which cost nearly $800 to build. Eli Barclay passed away in year 1893.[5]            

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[2] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive & Miller, p. 292-296

[3] McKay, p. 198-200

[4] Miller, p. 292-296

[5] McKay, p. 198-200

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This is a photo of Ed and his wife Martha Ann Willson of Rosemount Farm, which is located in Whitevale, specifically on Concession 4, the north half of Lot 21, and was taken in 1932.[1] In this photo, Ed Willson is seen with a partial beard, which has been styled into Friendly Mutton Chops. In this style, the sideburns are grown long and join each other above the mouth, forming a moustache that is connected to the sideburns, the chin on the other hand, remains clean shaven.[2]

Ed Willson is the son of Casper Willson, and he married his wife in 1880, raising a family of four children.[3] Willson lived in the Whitevale and Brougham area most of his life, taking over the family farm, which was on Lot 21, Concession 4, in the Pickering Township.[4] Willson and his wife celebrated their golden anniversary in 1930 and he passed away on November 19, 1934.[5]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

 

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive & Sabean, John W. Time Present and Time Past. Pickering: Altona Editions, 2000,

p.110.

[2] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[3] Miller, p. 391

[4] McKay, p. 226-227.

[5] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This is a portrait of Thomas Poucher taken around the year 1911. Poucher is seen with a partial beard in the style that is similar to a Circle Beard, but is fuller and longer. For this style, the hair that forms the moustache connects with the hair forming the goatee, encircling the mouth.[1]

Thomas Poucher was born in 1842, and is the son of Daniel Poucher.[2] In 1864, Poucher married Mary Anne Young, and had a family of two children, Adelia and Norman.  Throughout his life, Poucher filled many roles. For nearly forty years, he ran a successful auctioneering business that was located in Brougham.[3] Between the 1901 and 1902, Poucher held the role of Reeve in the Pickering Township.[4] In 1905, he was chosen to become a magistrate in Pickering.  Poucher was also very active in the St. John’s Presbyterian Church, serving as an elder for a number of years.[5]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

 

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[2] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive.

[3] Miller, p. 373

[4] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive.

[5] Miller, P.373

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Curiosity Corner

In December 2013, ten students from Trinity College School joined us at the museum for Week Without Walls.  The students researched, photographed and wrote brief blogs about each of the museum’s buildings.

Collins House

By:  Brenda Neri

Trinity College School

Two miles north of Chalk Lake in Reach Township was where the Collins House was originally located.

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The Collins House

The land was patented in 1811; the exact date of the building is unclear. Elmer Collins donated the house to Pickering Township Museum. The original owner was Robert James, a merchant and mill owner in Uxbridge, who sold the house in the 19th century to Elmer’s family.

This building is of vertical plank construction.  It consists of spiking the planks to the outside face of the sills, and varying the width of the planks in contrast to that of a regular ‘board-and-batten’ house.

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Exterior: Close Up of Vertical Plank

The exterior planks, which are 2 ¾” thick, provide the support for the floors and roof.

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Planks

The interior wall construction has a lath that was designed to hold the plaster. The plaster was mixed with horse hair to give it better consistency and “sticking power”. The row of spikes just above the door hood indicates the location of the second-floor beams.

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Wall Construction

Collins House is restored to represent a tradesman’s home of the 1850s, and is divided into rooms.

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Upstairs

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Upstairs- Parent’s Bedroom

The largest is the kitchen, which was the busiest room in the house.  It was common that the cast-iron stove was used for cooking, as it was better than a fireplace.

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Cast Iron Stove

Smaller rooms with a door separating them offered some privacy for the family. The upstairs has pegs on the walls for hanging up clothes and a wash stand next to the window.

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Washstand and Hanging Pegs

The Collins House was moved in October 1965 to the original museum site in Brougham. 

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This is a photo of young Hugh and Willie Miller, the sons of John Miller Jr. with Robert Miller their uncle, taken in 1900.[1] Robert Miller in this photograph is seen with a full beard in the style of a Short Boxed Beard. A Short Boxed Beard is a style of beard worn fairly short, but is still full and has an integrated moustache.[2]

Robert Miller was involved with his brothers and father, John Miller, Sr., in the firm entitled John Miller & Sons. This firm participated in the selling of pedigreed farm animals throughout North America. In the firm, Robert Miller was one of the primary salesmen and promoters, helping to establish a number of livestock organizations throughout North America.[3]

Hugh Miller married Elsie Moon in 1945, had a family of two sons, John and James. He remained on his family’s home settlement, raising livestock. William Allan Miller was the oldest son of John Miller, Jr. He married Dorothy Baker, and also had a family of two sons, George and Douglas. Willie Miller graduated from the University of Toronto with a degree in Physics and Mathematics.[4]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1]Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive.  

[2] Expanded Facial Hair Types Sheet

[3] Miller, Robert A. The Ontario Village of Brougham- Past! Present! Future? Canada: The Alger Press Limited, 1975, p. 359-365

[4] Miller, p. 359-365

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

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By Mary Willet

The individuals in this photo consist of Samuel Stevenson, his wife Susannah Stevenson (previously Susannah Green Anker), and their daughter Caroline and her daughter Maud and was taken around 1900.[1] Samuel Stevenson is seen wearing a full beard, the style, known in modern terms as a Ducktail with a prominent moustache. The Ducktail, is formed when the bottom of the beard is tapered to a point, and it would appear in this photo that his moustache is not connected to the rest of the beard, making it more prominent.[2]

Samuel Stevenson is the son of Thomas Stevenson, and had a family of nine children, although two children died in infancy and one of his sons’ died at the age of 11. Samuel Stevenson was born in 1844, and he bought the front of Lot 18, Concession 6, in Pickering, which was owned by his older brother Noble Stevenson. In 1921, Stevenson passed away, having lived in the Pickering Township for the majority of his life.[3]

Caroline Stevenson married Charles Barclay and had a family of six children, including her daughter Maud.[4]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive.       

[2] Expanded Facial Hair Types Sheet

[3] Miller, Robert A. The Ontario Village of Brougham- Past! Present! Future? Canada: The Alger Press Limited, 1975,

p. 384-387.

[4] Miller, p. 384-387

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This is a photograph of men that operated a number of different businesses in the Claremont area c.1910.[1] The men in this photo display a number of different styles of facial hair, of particular note:

Top row (left to right): The third individual has a moustache that is similar to the modern Copstash Standard, which involves a moustache that does not usually pass the length of the upper lip, and is not too bushy.[2] The eighth individual has a moustache that is similar to the Walrus, which is usually quite large, full and fairly droopy in style.[3]

2nd Row: The first, sixth and eighth individuals have a moustache in the style of a Handlebar Moustache, which is bushier with the ends waxed to point upwards. [4] The fifth individual has a full beard, in the style of a Short Boxed Beard, which is worn fairly short, but is still full and has an integrated moustache.[5]

3rd Row: The second and fifth individuals have a moustache in the style of a Chevron, inwhich the facial hair is usually worn thick as well as wide, and covers the upper lip. [6] The third and eighth individuals have a Copstash Standard Moustache.[7]

4th Row: The second individual has a moustache; however the style is unclear. The fourth individual has a full beard, in the style of Garibaldi, which is both wide and full, usually with a round bottom and an integrated moustache.[8] The fifth individual has a Copstash Standard Moustache. [9] The sixth individual has a Chevron Moustache.[10] The eighth individual has a Short Boxed Beard.[11]

5th Row: The first individual has a partial beard, in a style that is similar to a Van Dyke, signified by a separate moustache and goatee.[12] The third individual has a full beard in the style of a Ducktail, which is a beard with the bottom tapered to a point.[13] The fifth individual has a Handlebar Moustache.[14]

In the Claremont are there was a wide variety of businesses that were in operation during 1910, each with a unique specialty. The different businesses that these men represent include bakeries, banks, barber and butcher shops, funeral services, furniture shops, grocery stores, hotels, shoemakers, tailors, wagon makers, welders, medical doctors, veterinarians and post offices. Businesses in Claremont were rapidly expanding with the increasing importance of one road: the Brock Road.[15]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

 

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive.

[2] Expanded Facial Hair Types Sheet

[3]Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[4] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[5] Expanded Facial Hair Types Sheet

[6] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[7] Expanded Facial Hair Types Sheet

[8] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[9] Expanded Facial Hair Types Sheet

[10] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[11] Expanded Facial Hair Types Sheet

[12] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[13]Expanded Facial Hair Types Sheet

[14] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[15] Gauslin, p. 109-144.

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

View on Volunteers

Think spring!

By Mandy Smiles

Are you tired of winter? Can’t wait for spring? Here is a dose of summer sunshine to brighten your day! I asked the Bloomers & Britches Heritage Gardeners what their favourite plant was in the museum gardens, and below are some of their responses!

“My favourite is the Clematis over the trellis at the Miller Cole. Such perfect-shaped blooms and they make great cut flowers too. Clematis are my favourite garden flower overall and I think it’s because they look wonderful when they’re covered in blooms but the leaves are still very attractive when it’s finished flowering. Plus you can have flowers from spring to fall with a variety of clematis.” Helen

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“I love the nasturtiums that are planted in the herb garden! They are so beautiful in their leaf/bloom combination. They are also used in food production. What is not to love?” Kathie

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Nasturtiums in the Miller-Cole Garden.

“My favourite plant is Bee Balm – Monarda Didyma. It is a native perennial plant used by the early settlers to dye wool and fabric and grows in the dye garden at the museum. It has a stunning red flower which lasts through the summer and attracts pollinators and humming birds.” Rosemary

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Above is the Dye Garden at PMV.

“My favourite plant that we grow at PMV is citron. Most people have never heard of it and know nothing about it. I enjoy talking to the children about it and researching culinary uses for it.” Helena

“Heliotrope was planted in the Miller-Cole house parlour garden in 2013. As the summer progressed and the plant grew and thrived, the purple blooms covered each plant and fragrance, under the hot sun, filled the air. No wonder the gardeners of the 19th century loved it. I do too.” Barb

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Heliotrope in the Miller-Cole Parlour Garden

"I think it has to be Joe-Pye Weed. It looks sensational in bloom and blooms for a long time.  Named after a Native American herbalist, it was used to lower fevers. Very little maintenance is required for this plant, although moist soil is beneficial when grown in full sun. Loved by hummingbirds & butterflies.” Trish

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Joe Pye Weed above.

"I have so many favourites, but Joe Pye weed is probably the best. This plant is a survivor - like our early settlers. It is tolerant of a variety of weather conditions and locations. It rises above most other plants at the end of the summer when other plants are not at their best. It needs no special care and it attracts the butterflies with it’s magnificent display of pinkish/purple blooms. What more can I say?" Christine

The Bloomers & Britches is made up of a hardy band of gardeners who work in the gardens of the museum village Tuesday or Saturday mornings, from May until October. As well as hands-on gardening, the club researches, plans, and plants the heritage gardens. There are 2 Saturday sessions, one in May, “Turnover”, and one in October, “Turnunder”, when all the members gather together to open and close the gardening season. Bloomers & Britches welcome new members with open arms. Visit pickering.ca/museum to find out more or to download and application to become a volunteer.

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Butterfly Garden at main entrance to museum village.

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This is a photo of an elderly individual, who quite possibly could be Asa Post.[1] Asa Post is seen with a full beard that is in the style of a Garibaldi. A Garibaldi is a style of beard that is both wide and full, usually with a round bottom and a moustache that is connected with the rest of the facial hair.[2]

Asa Post is the son of George Washington Post and the brother of Jordan Post.[3] He was born in 1806 in the Pickering Township. Post married Ann Reilly, a young woman from Ireland, and raised a family of two children, William and Albert Post.[4] He purchased up to 33 acres from Lot 19, Concession 1 which was on Kingston Road. Later his brother Jordan Post would purchase the same land from him.[5] Asa Post passed away on January 14th, 1851.[6] 

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

 

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive.

[2] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[3] McKay, William A. The Pickering Story. Ontario: The Township of Pickering Historical Society,1961, p. 222-223

[4] Descendents of Jordan Post Document. Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive.

[5] McKay, p.222-223

[6] Descendents of Jordan Post Document. Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive.

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Curiosity Corner

In December 2013, ten students from Trinity College School joined us at the museum for Week Without Walls.  The students researched, photographed and wrote brief blogs about each of the museum’s buildings.

Log House

By Sean C.

Trinity College School

The log house is one of the oldest buildings on the grounds and thus has become the most foreign to my more modern understanding of buildings. Orginally built in the early-mid 1800’s. When I first saw the house it was a cold -7o C outside, and I can honestly say that I wouldn’t rush into the house to protect myself from the temperature. It looks quite old minus the windows and doors which boast a much newer bright red paint job.

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The cabin represents a home a backwoods settler family may have taken residence in and built themselves. The house was last owned by Nicholas Corchis Jr. who offered the house to the Pickering Museum in 1959, but the last residence of the house was Henry Morgan.

From the perspective of a 17 year old science student, whose main interest isn’t history this adventure of writing a blog about a nearly 200 year old house did not set off my interests. Surprisingly though my initial pessimist attitude was almost immediately reverted as I ventured around. Simply being near any of the buildings sparks the thoughts of life at the time, especially when you are wearing 4 layers, and a toque but no gloves, and you feel like you’re about to freeze to death. These settlers had nothing near this comfort, and they had to live in a house built with simplistic tools. It boggles my mind the willingness to succeed of those that lived in the building.

I specifically found the notching at the corners of the building to be the most interesting outer architectural aspect of the house. The dovetailing style of notching shows the ingenious minds of the settlers who had limitations on how they built their houses. An example I heard was that they didn’t even have nails, which is why notching was so popular, and the nails they did have were commonly made from wood. The simple fact that this house stands before the Durham region today is enough information to confirm in my mind the success of the structure.

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Viewing buildings similar to this is something few of us get to do, and I think visits to buildings similar to this log house help remind us of the remarkable abilities of our ancestors. As a student from Trinity College School I would like to thank the volunteers at the Museum for the vast amount of time they spend helping us learn about Canadian history.