Thursday, June 26, 2014

Beef Ring Barn

In December 2013, ten students from Trinity College School joined us at the museum for Week Without Walls.  The students researched, photographed and wrote brief blogs about each of the museum’s buildings.

Beef Ring Barn

By Susie Bahen

Trinity College School

The barn was originally located south of the 9th Concession (Lot 12, Concession 8, Pickering Township). H. R. Gray generously donated the building. 

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This is what the Beef Ring Barn looks like in the winter.

It’s a small building, 12 ½ x 16 ½. It is board-and-batten construction. As you can see in the pictures, it has wood panels with pieces of wood running down the sides.

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This is what board and batten looks like.

The roof is covered in wood shingles, with wood pieces running across the bottom. The shingles are made of cedar by the volunteers at the Pickering Museum Village.

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These are the shingles on the roof.  They were made by PMV Volunteers.

The beef ring barn was like a community butcher and no pieces of meat would be wasted.

This particular building was built in 1870 and used until the early fifties, according to Ed Cammack, the last butcher’s brother.

After being fattened up through the summer, the animals would be sent to the barn to be prepared to be preserved. Each animal would have to weigh a certain amount or more. If the animal weighed less, the owner would have to pay a fee for every pound it was under. Each member would get a 20-pound share of a 600-pound cow.  However, by the time it was skinned and the parts that would not have been eaten were removed the weight would be reduced to 400 pounds. Any excess meat went to the animals’ owner and his family.

The Beef Ring Barn would help bring people of the community together; they would help each other stay fed and get protein.

Works Cited:                        

Robert A. Miller’s Book The Ontario Village of       Brougham: Past! Present! Future?. Published 1973

Oral history recorded from Ed Cammack, Fall 2008

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Curiosity Corner

In December 2013, ten students from Trinity College School joined us at the museum for Week Without Walls.  The students researched, photographed and wrote brief blogs about each of the museum’s buildings.

The Bible Christian Chapel

By: Connor Purdy

Trinity College School

The Bible Christian Chapel is an older building, built in 1853. It was originally located in the northeast corner of the intersection of the 24th Line and the 5th Concession of the Pickering Township. The owner of the building was originally a Quaker, who later converted to a Bible Christian, named Nathaniel Hastings. The building was towed from its previous location by a powerful truck, to where it lies now, in the Pickering Museum Village.

The Chapel has had many additions to it including the old reel pump organ. The organ was made by the Estey Organ Co. in 1887.  Fun fact, the organ still works and is played for enjoyment.

The candle fixtures have been re-created and donated by a local blacksmith in 2001. The candle features can be lowered to a point where they can be lit. Even though the lighting has been re-created, there still is no source of heat such as a stove or a fireplace in the Chapel.

The Pickering Museum Village Foundation, with a grant from Benjamin Moore Paint Co., had the inside of the chapel repainted. The benches have been replicated and replaced, but the locations of the original benches are easily identifiable.

As seen in the photographs below, the arcs above the windows and front entrance make it an obvious example of gothic architecture.

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Bible Christian Chapel - Looking North West

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Bible Christian Chapel - Windows

Although the Bible Chapel may not immediately look like one of the most interesting buildings, the rich history and the original features make it a very intriguing structure.

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Through the Keyhole at the Bible Christian Chapel

Work Cited:

McKay, William A. The Pickering Story. Pickering: The Township of Pickering Historical Society, 2004. Print.

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This is a photograph of a famous painter, Tom Thomson, taken in 1895.[1] Thomson is seen with a moustache that has been styled into a Pyramidal Moustache. A Pyramidal Moustache is shorter on the top, and longer on the bottom, slightly resembling a pyramid.[2]

Tom Thomson was born in 1877 in Pickering, on Concession 8 and was the son of John Thomson. As a young man, Thomson became quite a famous painter, eventually joining and becoming one of the famous “Group of Seven.”  After his death in 1917, his paintings have been put on display around the world, in many different exhibitions.[3]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca

 



[1] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive  and Lillian M. Gauslin. From Paths to Planes: A Story of the Claremont Area.

Ontario: Lillian M. Gauslin, 1974, p. 266-267.

[2] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[3] Gauslin, p. 266-267.

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This photograph was taken in the 1900s of Frederick Lachlan Green.[1] In this photo Green is sporting a moustache, which he styled into a Handlebar Moustache. A Handlebar Moustache is a style of moustache that can be worn either long or petite. It is usually a bushier style of moustache, with the ends grown long and curled upwards with the help of wax. [2]

Frederick L. Green is the grandson of the founder of Greenwood, Frederick Green, whom he was named after. In 1894, he married Katherine Stevenson, and he continued to run the Green enterprises in the village of Greenwood. Green, was also both a farmer as well as a miller, and eventually became the President of the Dominion Jersey Breeders Association; raising a large herd of Jersey cattle on the farm he named Unadilla.[3] Green passed away on April 29 1945, and he is buried in the Pickering area.[4]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive. Pickering Public Library & Ajax Public Library. 2003. Web. July-August 2013. <http://www.pada.ca/>  

[2] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013. Web. July-August 2013.

http://www.ftmguide.org/facialhair.html#top

[3] Beatrice McLean and Irven McLean. Greenwood Through the Years. Canada:  The Forum, 1963

[4] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive, and McLean, 1963.

Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This is a photograph of Samuel Green, the son of Frederick Green, the founder of Greenwood.[1] The facial hairstyle displayed in this photo is a partial beard in the style of Mutton Chops. For this style, the sideburns are grown longer as well as wider. Mutton Chops are one of the most common styles of facial hair. Usually the chin is kept clean shaven, although the sideburns can be grown to almost reach the chin line.[2]

Samuel Green was born in 1836, married Catherine Slater and had a family of four children, including Frederick L. Green. Following in his father’s footprints, Green entered the milling business, carrying on his father’s legacy. Beginning in 1877, Green became the deputy reeve of the Pickering Township; this was only a year before his death at the age of 41.[3]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive. & McLean, Greenwood Through the Years.

[2] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013

[3] McLean, Greenwood Through the Years

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This is a photograph of the Green River Shamrocks Football Club, taken in 1909.[1] Three individuals in the back row of this photo display facial hair. From left to right, the first and third men have moustaches in the style of a Chevron, which is worn longer, bushier and covering the upper lip. [2]  The second man has a moustache in the style of a Copstash Standard, which is the length of the upper lip, and is not too bushy.[3] 

Throughout the history of the Pickering Township, football was one of the most popular summer sports played. It was in 1898 that the Green Shamrocks was first established, and quickly became a powerful club.  The football club was eventually added to the Ontario Association, and it won the league championships during the years of 1907, 1909, 1910 in the Pickering Township area. This football club even went so far as to place 2nd out of all Ontario teams, in the years 1907 and 1910, playing in the final games.[4]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive.

[2] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013 & Expanded Facial Hair Types Sheet

[3] Expanded Facial Hair Types Sheet

[4] Wood, William R. Past Years in Pickering. Toronto: William Briggs, 1911, p. 209

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

In this photo taken in 1880, Eli Barclay has a full beard, in the style of a Spade. A Spade beard is a larger and longer style of beard that is joined through the side burns, and does not involve a moustache.[1] 

Eli Barclay was born in 1825, to George Elder Barclay, in the Pickering Township.[2] After his father’s death, he remained on the family farm, becoming quite wealthy during the years of the Crimean War, cultivating his land.[3] Barclay married Mary Ann Harper, and raised a family of eight children.[4] In 1865, Eli Barclay finished the construction of his home, which he entitled “Ever Green Villa”, which cost nearly $800 to build. Eli Barclay passed away in year 1893.[5]            

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[2] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive & Miller, p. 292-296

[3] McKay, p. 198-200

[4] Miller, p. 292-296

[5] McKay, p. 198-200

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This is a photo of Ed and his wife Martha Ann Willson of Rosemount Farm, which is located in Whitevale, specifically on Concession 4, the north half of Lot 21, and was taken in 1932.[1] In this photo, Ed Willson is seen with a partial beard, which has been styled into Friendly Mutton Chops. In this style, the sideburns are grown long and join each other above the mouth, forming a moustache that is connected to the sideburns, the chin on the other hand, remains clean shaven.[2]

Ed Willson is the son of Casper Willson, and he married his wife in 1880, raising a family of four children.[3] Willson lived in the Whitevale and Brougham area most of his life, taking over the family farm, which was on Lot 21, Concession 4, in the Pickering Township.[4] Willson and his wife celebrated their golden anniversary in 1930 and he passed away on November 19, 1934.[5]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

 

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive & Sabean, John W. Time Present and Time Past. Pickering: Altona Editions, 2000,

p.110.

[2] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[3] Miller, p. 391

[4] McKay, p. 226-227.

[5] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Whisker Wednesdays

By Mary Willet

This is a portrait of Thomas Poucher taken around the year 1911. Poucher is seen with a partial beard in the style that is similar to a Circle Beard, but is fuller and longer. For this style, the hair that forms the moustache connects with the hair forming the goatee, encircling the mouth.[1]

Thomas Poucher was born in 1842, and is the son of Daniel Poucher.[2] In 1864, Poucher married Mary Anne Young, and had a family of two children, Adelia and Norman.  Throughout his life, Poucher filled many roles. For nearly forty years, he ran a successful auctioneering business that was located in Brougham.[3] Between the 1901 and 1902, Poucher held the role of Reeve in the Pickering Township.[4] In 1905, he was chosen to become a magistrate in Pickering.  Poucher was also very active in the St. John’s Presbyterian Church, serving as an elder for a number of years.[5]

Show us your facial hairstyle and register for the 4th Annual Beard & Moustache Competition at PMV’s Gears & Gourmet event June 7, 2014. To find out more or to download a registration form click here: http://www.pickering.ca/en/discovering/events.asp

 

Photograph courtesy of Pickering Public Library www.pada.ca



[1] Hudson. Facial Hair: Growth and Grooming. 2013.

[2] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive.

[3] Miller, p. 373

[4] Pickering-Ajax Digital Archive.

[5] Miller, P.373

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Curiosity Corner

In December 2013, ten students from Trinity College School joined us at the museum for Week Without Walls.  The students researched, photographed and wrote brief blogs about each of the museum’s buildings.

Collins House

By:  Brenda Neri

Trinity College School

Two miles north of Chalk Lake in Reach Township was where the Collins House was originally located.

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The Collins House

The land was patented in 1811; the exact date of the building is unclear. Elmer Collins donated the house to Pickering Township Museum. The original owner was Robert James, a merchant and mill owner in Uxbridge, who sold the house in the 19th century to Elmer’s family.

This building is of vertical plank construction.  It consists of spiking the planks to the outside face of the sills, and varying the width of the planks in contrast to that of a regular ‘board-and-batten’ house.

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Exterior: Close Up of Vertical Plank

The exterior planks, which are 2 ¾” thick, provide the support for the floors and roof.

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Planks

The interior wall construction has a lath that was designed to hold the plaster. The plaster was mixed with horse hair to give it better consistency and “sticking power”. The row of spikes just above the door hood indicates the location of the second-floor beams.

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Wall Construction

Collins House is restored to represent a tradesman’s home of the 1850s, and is divided into rooms.

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Upstairs

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Upstairs- Parent’s Bedroom

The largest is the kitchen, which was the busiest room in the house.  It was common that the cast-iron stove was used for cooking, as it was better than a fireplace.

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Cast Iron Stove

Smaller rooms with a door separating them offered some privacy for the family. The upstairs has pegs on the walls for hanging up clothes and a wash stand next to the window.

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Washstand and Hanging Pegs

The Collins House was moved in October 1965 to the original museum site in Brougham.